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a spring collection with the DESIGNER JADE 35™

I’ve been excited about this post for weeks. Since February, I’ve had the DESIGNER JADE 35™ and today I can finally show you each and every piece I’ve made using it. I’m probably most pleased with the variety of garments and fabrics in this group, because being able to sew effortlessly on a lot of different fabrics is a true test of a sewing machine’s salt. In all, I made 13 (thirteen!!) garments on this machine, which is to say nothing of the handful of other garments that saw at least some action on it. Dresses, tops, and a pair of pants in cotton, linen, brocade, ponte knit, and rayon challis make for some seriously fabulous new clothes. (I played dress up all weekend!)

In addition to the collection, I’m going to cover some embroidery basics, because it’s an excellent feature of this machine. I’m still relatively new to the embroidery game (why I was so nervous about it before I’ll never know), and I’ve learned a lot about it over the past couple of months. Now I’m really, really excited to get into it more because quality embroidery never goes out of style, especially here in Texas–land of cowboy boots, fringe, leather, and embroidered clothes.

As soon as I unpacked the DESIGNER JADE 35™ I had a little blouse in my projects pile to sew, so this rayon challis top was the first garment I made on this machine. Like I mentioned a couple weeks ago, all I did was tell the machine was I was working on, and it did all the work. I used a size 70 needle and the woven light fabric setting on the machine. Whipped up this cutie in an afternoon. (The pattern is Vogue 9002.)

This linen blouse is one of my favorite pieces for spring. I used the woven medium setting with a size 80 needle. The narrow hems and bias tape on the neck were a breeze to sew. This is McCall’s 7573.

For this brocade top, I utilized the blind hem stitch which gave the top a nice, clean finish. The pattern is McCall’s 7542, and I also made it in blue.

I made this rayon/nylon ponte knit dress–one of my favorite dresses of all time–with a size 80 stretch needle on the stretch medium setting on the machine. It was so much fun to sew, and there’s a blind hem on this one too. This is Vogue 8825.

I made this cocktail dress for an event in Florida last month. There’s an invisible zipper at center back which I inserted using the zipper foot. Easy! (More about this dress here.)

These three tops are all the same pattern, and sewing the trim was easy and fun. I used a zigzag stitch to attach the white floral trim. No special foot needed!

This gingham linen dress (Butterick 6446) was made with the woven medium fabric setting and a size 80 needle. There’s an invisible zipper in center back, and it’s fully lined.

I am loving these linen pants! They were a blast to make. There’s a fly front zipper, bar tacks at the pocket edges and bottom of the zipper (I used the decorative stitch foot for this), a button, belt loops, back-button flaps, and a stitched hem. Pattern is Vogue 8836 (out-of-print).

This dress, one of my favorite patterns, was the most recent make. The skirt is gathered, and there’s a centered zipper in the back. Again, it was as easy as using a size 80 needle on the woven medium setting.

Before I became a HUSQVARNA VIKING® customer 10+ years ago, buttonholes intimidated me like you wouldn’t believe. I never had successful buttonholes until I invested in my first HUSQVARNA VIKING® machine, and now I don’t expect anything less than perfect buttonholes every time. On the DESIGNER JADE 35™ you can do buttonholes two ways: manually or with the buttonhole foot. I used the buttonhole foot to make the 12 buttonholes on this blouse, and they’re beautiful. This pattern is Vogue 8772.

Now, a few basics about embroidery. First things first, don’t be intimidated. I certainly was, and there was no need to be. I paid a visit to my local HUSQVARNA VIKING® dealer (in a local JoAnn Fabrics & Crafts), and I chatted with a professional one evening about all things embroidery. Here’s the main thing to remember: embroidery is a lot like sewing. Different fabrics require different needles, and there’s an element of experimentation that goes along with it. Stabilizer is also important, as is buying good quality embroidery thread.

#1. Always use bobbin thread in your bobbin for embroidery projects.

#2. Choose the right size needles. The embroidery in this post was done on cotton poplin, and I used a size 80 titanium embroidery needle. (Titanium is the new thing in needles. It’s supposed to make it stronger, and I definitely didn’t have any issues on this project.)

#3. Read your manual. I promise, the step-by-step instructions will not lead you astray, and setting up the machine for embroidery is a breeze.

#4. Choose a quality stabilizer. For this project I used INSPIRA® Tear-A-Way Stabilizer, and it worked like a charm.

#5. Included in the accessories pack of the DESIGNER JADE 35™ is a USB stick with embroidery designs and HUSQVARNA VIKING® DESIGNER JADE 35™ sampler book. I simply plugged it into my computer, looked through the sampler book, and picked a design. Because I’m a newbie, I went with a design that was one solid color to avoid thread changes. Later this summer, you better believe I’ll be doing embroidery with tons and tons of colors!

The design I chose is #43 in the sampler book, and I went with a pale pink embroidery thread. I love it!

And there you have it! I can’t say enough about the DESIGNER JADE 35™, and I’m beyond pleased with the garments I made with it. I even sent my dad a bunch of videos of the embroidery in action. It was so much fun to watch!

I hope you’ve enjoyed following along as I used this fantastic sewing and embroidery machine. I’ve had the best time, and I can’t wait to see what I get to sew with next!

pretty and pink: mccall’s 7573

A couple weeks ago, I talked a little bit about trends: following them, wearing them, and making them work for your lifestyle. For me, 2017 feels like the year of detailed trends. There isn’t necessarily one single item everyone is lusting after (except maybe an off-the-shoulder top); instead, it’s specific details and fabrics like interesting sleeves and gingham and embroidery. The gingham trend makes me especially happy, because it happens to be one of my favorite prints. It’s so classic and fresh and perfect for spring and summer. Ruffles are also all over the place, on sleeves and tops and skirts and jackets and everything in between. It’s another trend I really like, but it’s easy to get carried away and go overboard with it. That’s why I was immediately smitten with this new pattern, McCall’s 7573. The ruffle is so delicate and ladylike, and I’m particularly fond of the option with the yoke, view D, which is what I made. We all can’t rock off-the-shoulder tops, so this is a fantastic option if you’re less inclined to show a lot of skin like I am. Plus, you might even be able to get away with it on casual Friday at the office with a denim pencil skirt and flats.

Linen isn’t listed on the pattern envelope as a suggested fabric, but I knew it would work. There’s more body in linen than a crepe de chine or gauze, which is one of the reasons I picked it for this pattern. I wanted something that would show off the ruffle a little better, and it happens to be one of my favorite fabrics to wear in spring and summer (and this one isn’t a blend, it’s 100% linen). I also loved the idea of this bigger scale gingham because it pairs nicely with the big shape of the pattern pieces. This fabric was a wholesale purchase I made back when I was in business. I bought every yard they had, so it’s sold out. It came from Fashion Fabrics Club.

This is a very easy project to sew, and I made it in a day. I didn’t change a thing about the pattern, but I did cut one size smaller than I normally do which was the right call. The only tricky part about this top is making big motions with your arms. Raise them too far over your head and the whole blouse goes with you. The seam around the body and shoulders where the ruffle is sewn is why this happens. My advice? Don’t do jumping jacks in this one.

Otherwise, this sweet little top could not be more comfortable. The day I took these photos, I also photographed a fitted dress, and I was so much more comfortable after I changed into this outfit. The top is nice and billowy without being a tent, and it’s easy to put on and take off.

Eventually, it will be too hot to wear jeans here in Texas and when it is, I think this top will be lovely with shorts or a short denim skirt. Right now, it makes for the perfect transition piece with skinny or boyfriend jeans. I’d like to make this top again and, when I do, I think I’ll lengthen it into a dress. Wouldn’t that be darling?!

I made my own bias tape using my fabric and I sewed it down on my machine, instead of slip stitching it by hand. it was easier and I think it looks a little more polished.

Very happy with this little top, and I look forward to making it again. Now, I’m off to sew some dresses. Have a great week!

progress report: the yellow stripe project

I tell you what, making your clothes is always an adventure. If you follow me on Instagram, you know I’m in the midst of a project or two with some gorgeous yellow stripe rayon/silk fabric. Or I was, anyway, until a couple days ago. After getting about halfway through a dress and barely started on a skirt, I decided to scrap them both and go with one dress, the very dress that I originally wanted to make and then talked myself out of, in the name of “doing something different.”

My extra careful, overthinking it approach to this project stems from two things: this fabric was not cheap (so don’t mess it up!), and the abstract stripe absolutely requires that you give the garment a little more consideration. Back in January, I bought the fabric from Promenade Fabrics, and it’s spectacular. Also in January, I made Vogue 9197 for the umpteenth time in a navy stripe fabric, so I felt like I should do something new with this special yellow stripe. They’re two completely different fabrics though, so I shouldn’t have worried so much about making the same dress.

When it comes to stripe fabric, I like to use it in a literal, directional way. If it’s too abstract, it bugs me. An abstract interpretation can work beautifully and it’s interesting to see a jumble of stripes in all different directions, but I appreciate something a little more simple and subtle. I’m also someone who thinks about the longevity of my garments, and I don’t want to steer too far from classic lines so I can enjoy the garment for as long as possible. The yellow stripe has an abstract feel to it on its own–the stripes are painted and uneven and marvelous, so going with a simple design doesn’t mean it’s not thoughtful or interesting.

I had about 4.25 yards of this fabric, which is enough for two garments, depending on what they were. After such success with Butterick 6446 last month (that is one of my favorite dresses so far this year), I thought I would do that one again, this time in the yellow stripe. I loved it in a major, major way until I attached the skirt and tried it on. It was awful, and you’ll just have to believe me because there will never be a reason to post the photo that documents how horrible it was. The skirt fell flat, the stripes were a mess, and there’s too much body in the fabric for the pleats to lay nicely across the bodice.

You’d never guess it was so unattractive on, because it is so darling on the form.

So, I left it on the form for a few days to see if it grew on me. I even tried it on a number of times, forcing myself to say that I would wear it. I was lying to myself, because there was no way I’d ever happily pick it from my closet and feel good in it. And that should never be the case with our clothes, especially the ones we invest so much time into making. A fabric this pretty deserves to be made into something I not only love, but would feel good in and want to wear. So, it was back to the drawing board.

Fortunately, there’s no zipper in the dress yet, so removing the skirt an reusing it will be easy. As for the maxi skirt, I’m going to use that too and cut a new bodice. The maxi skirt (the second garment I was making) had been cut and I’d started to gather the skirt, but I messed up cutting it and cut it into thirds instead of in half. (We all flub sometimes, folks. I was due!) So, I was working through the challenge of fixing that too. This was a comedy of errors from the word go! Also, when and where was I going to wear this fabulous maxi skirt? The grocery store?!

Late Monday night, I quickly pinned the fabric to the dress form in the way I originally wanted: a fitted, sleeveless bodice with a bateau neckline, and a gathered skirt, both cut to show the stripe horizontally. I was in love. So, after all that fuss and work, I’m starting over. I couldn’t be happier about it.

This? This I can get behind, and this isn’t anything but a sloppy drape job. But I can see the final result, and I know I’ll love it. Doesn’t it look more like me and something I’d wear? I think it does, and I also love the stripes all in one direction. The gathers in the skirt will give it some volume and body, and the fitted, uncomplicated bodice will show off the stripe really well. The bateau neckline mimics the stripe and draws the eye up and out towards the shoulders. Then, with the nice fit around the waist and the full skirt, you have a lovely ladylike silhouette. My favorite.

So, this is my solution, and I’m really excited to whip it up. The skirt is cut in rectangular sections, so provided I don’t muck it up again, that will be easy. I will draft the bodice using my slopers, and with side seam pockets, an invisible zipper, and a lining, we’re good to go.

Has this ever happened to you? You’re stuck working on a project you don’t love, then you turn it around and start over? I’d love to commiserate!

I may not work with it much, but I do love yellow. I designed a handful of pieces when I was in business, and I have the pleated striped skirt in my closet. See, my eye for placing stripes in a deliberate direction goes way back!

sewing magic with the DESIGNER JADE™ 35

A few weeks ago, I announced a partnership with my favorite sewing machine brand, HUSQVARNA VIKING®. I’m happy to report that I’m having the best time! The best part about this collaboration is that I get to use some of their coolest sewing and embroidery machines and report back to you about all the incredible things they can do. Today, I’m delighted to tell you about the machine I’ve been using for the past six weeks, the DESIGNER JADE™ 35.

I’m so glad we kicked off this series with this particular machine. While it’s packed full of features even the most experienced seamstress can appreciate, this machine is especially great for beginners or folks getting back into sewing after some time away from the craft. The DESIGNER JADE™ 35 does it all from basic stitching and blind hems to buttonholes and complex embroidery. Plus, it’s easily the cutest machine you’ve ever seen, and I cannot get over how smart the storage solutions are. Whoever thought to design a storage box in the middle of the sewing machine deserves a prize. Genius!

There’s even more storage in the accessories tray, which easily slides off when you’re ready to attach the embroidery unit.

My favorite features of DESIGNER JADE™ 35 have everything to do with the ease with which it’s used. Right out of the box, I put this machine to the test, sewing a rayon challis blouse, a brocade top (did a blind hem on that one!), a rayon ponte knit dress (another blind hem!), and a pretty cotton dress. Going from project to project in all those fabrics was as simple as changing my needle and pressing a button. There were no tension issues or skipped stitched or broken threads. Not once! The DESIGNER JADE™ 35 has the HUSQVARNA VIKING® Exclusive SEWING ADVISOR™ feature, which automatically sets the best stitch, stitch length, stitch width and thread tension for your projects. No more worrying about manual adjustments!

The User’s Guide tells you what fabric type corresponds with what button on the machine. There’s even a setting for sewing leather!

Here, I’m sewing a piece of cotton sateen, a medium weight woven fabric, or “B” on the machine. I’m sewing a straight stitch, which is “1” in the column next to the fabric buttons. Your fabric choice and selected stitch then pop up on the display, so you know what setting you’re using. The machine also tells you what needle to use, so there’s no confusion.

And here’s the DESIGNER JADE™ 35 in action, sewing a straight stitch on cotton:

The ultimate test for any sewing machine is denim or leather. With the use of the self-adhesive guide plates on my presser foot, I sewed through leather like it was butter. (I’m still impressed by this!)

Don’t have a serger? No worries! This machine has a built-in seam/overcast stitch, which finishes the raw edges of your seams beautifully. The presser foot for this stitch is included in the accessories pack that comes with the machine.

One stitch I use quite often is the blind hem. I love the clean, professional look it gives to my garments, and it’s so easy to do. The presser foot used for this stitch is also included in the accessories pack. (You pretty much have everything you need in that pack!)

When you’re ready to dive into embroidery, all you have to do is remove the accessories tray and attach the embroidery unit. There are 70 designs and 1 embroidery font stored on the USB stick that is included the accessories pack, so you can get started right away without worrying about fancy software. The sampler book is a PDF file on the USB stick, which you can upload on your computer. You can also adjust, personalize and combine your embroidery designs; create monograms on your computer. Rotate, mirror, scale and resize any design with the option to keep stitch density constant, and much more!

I was quite intimidated by the very idea of embroidery before I sat down to experiment with it, but it’s so easy to set up and get going. And, just like changing your settings for sewing different fabrics, all you have to do is change your needle and thread. The machine does the rest of the work for you.

Not only is the large DESIGNER™ Jewel Hoop 240 x 150 mm (9 ½” x 6″) included with your DESIGNER JADE™ 35, but this machine embroiders at some of the fastest speeds on the market. It was really something to press the start button and watch it go!

The more I used this machine, the longer my list of favorite features became. There’s nothing complicated or fussy about it, but it still does some amazing things. In addition to embroidery, there are also 120 stitches on the machine: utility stitches, sewing fonts, buttonhole styles, quilt stitches, and decorative stitches. And you have the option for free motion quilting, manual or one-step buttonholes, jeans or stretch hems, sewing buttons, sewing zippers, and darning and mending.

It’s magic, I tell you!

the florida collection

There’s nothing more rewarding in sewing then when a plan comes together, when weeks of thinking and organizing and fitting and cutting and sewing finally come together. In February, I posted my thoughts about a few new pieces I wanted to have for a trip to Florida. The trip has since come and gone (and it was fantastic!), and now it’s time to see, of the things on the list, what came together and what didn’t.

You know I love to sew in groups or collections of garments, and sewing for a specific event or trip is my ultimate project. It is so much fun! I always appreciate a collection with a clear and cohesive color story with coordinating prints, and this particular group is lacking in that respect. The blue top sticks out like a sore thumb and I’ve got three very different prints going on, but this project was more about specific garments for specific events, so from that perspective I’m very pleased.

In the planning post, I mentioned that I needed the following: a couple comfy tops to travel in, a swimsuit cover up, a cocktail dress, a couple of sundresses, and an outfit for exploring Miami.

Garments successfully made: tops, cocktail dress, sundresses, Miami outfit

Garments not made: swimsuit cover up

I had big plans for a wrap skirt swimsuit cover up in this yummy rayon challis, but time ran out before I could get to that project. (I ordered a navy sarong from Amazon and called it good.) As we got closer to the departure date I had to prioritize my unfinished projects, and this one got left behind. I’m okay with that though, because I think this fabric will be great for another project in a summer/4th of July collection I’m planning. Maybe a maxi dress?

I finished this dress first, and I wore it to dinner one night. I am completely and totally in love with this little gingham number, and it was perfect for this trip. It’s linen so it wrinkled quite a bit and required some ironing after we got there, but that’s okay with me. It was so comfortable, and I got loads of nice compliments on it. For more about this dress, see this post.

Full disclosure: I made this dress last summer. I knew it would be a great dress for this trip, and it was. I wore this to the welcome reception on the beach. Loved it. For more about this dress as well as a tip for a better fitting bust, see this post from last week.

I made three tops for this trip, all using the same pattern. This one is my favorite of the bunch. The floral trim is just so pretty! It wasn’t ridiculously hot in Florida yet, so I could still wear jeans and not be uncomfortably hot. My travel outfits and the exploring Miami outfit were the same: one of these tops, skinny jeans, a hat, and sandals. It was great. For more about these tops and a tutorial for the ruffle, see this post.

The cocktail dress: easily one of my favorite projects. I got more compliments on this dress than I’ve ever gotten on any other project, ever. So not only was I glad other people liked it as much as I did, I was proud to tell them that I made it. (You should have seen some of the reactions that got!) Read about the cocktail dress here.

This is by no means a sundress, but it came in handy for another dinner event. This is one of my all time favorite patterns, and this is fourth time I’ve made this dress. Read about the others here and here. This is Vogue 8825 in a coral rayon ponte knit from Mood.

I also planned to make a pair of white linen pants, and while I did make them, I didn’t take them to Florida. They didn’t really work with the tops I made, so you’ll see those soon with a top that makes a little more sense.

I was so excited to get pretty blog pictures on the beach (what a great opportunity, right?), but a funny thing happens when I get to a beach: I don’t care about pretty pictures. I’m much more concerned with how quickly I can throw on a swimsuit, get to the beach, and swim my little heart out. There were also a lot of people there, and taking selfies and blog pictures in front of a bunch of strangers isn’t my idea of a good time. At any rate, the trip was a wonderful, and I couldn’t be happier with the collection I made for it.

Now, on to more projects!