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Category: patternmaking

how to: the striped skirt

There are a few things you can always count on me to make on a regular basis: full skirts, fit and flare dresses, pretty blouses, and anything striped. Stripes are so charming and fun to work with, and the striped garments I make are some of my most worn items. (Which reminds me, I need to source some pretty striped shirting fabric. Ah, the endless fabric hunt!)

I designed a skirt a few years ago when I was in business out of sheer necessity. I had long envisioned a pleated, flared skirt with even, balanced stripes, but it’s no easy task bringing that idea to life without getting a little creative. Now, to be clear, there are easier ways to make something similar to the skirt in this post. You can use a printed stripe fabric, cut a rectangle out of it, and pleat it into a waistband or bodice. In fact, that’s an easy project for beginners, so that might be a great place to start. For me, I wanted a designed skirt with built in flare so that it didn’t fall flat from the waist, which is exactly what just cutting a rectangle will do. I also wanted to call the shots in terms of skirt length, stripe width, and overall design. So I made my own stripes, and today I’m showing you how to do the same thing. And the beauty of this concept is that it can be applied to any garment. So, in addition to my design, I will also be showing you a Butterick pattern I adjusted to make a striped pencil skirt.

Let’s go over a few things before we get started on the pattern:

  • I used cotton sateen to make these skirts. Another good option would be poplin or lightweight twill. I also lined the skirt using the half circle skirt pattern.
  • There are side seam pockets in this skirt, but you can go with another pocket option or omit them entirely.
  • Because this skirt becomes quite wide with the addition of the pleats, it is cut on the crossgrain.
  • I made the pattern for this skirt using my skirt slopers, to which I added flare and the inverted box pleats. Then I adjusted the length and determined the width of the stripes. The same result can be achieved by starting with a half circle skirt, which is what we’re going to do today. For instructions on how to draft a half circle skirt pattern, see this post.
  • There is no tutorial for the waistband, zipper, pockets, lining or hem in this post. I’m assuming you know these things. The focus here is on making the pattern and sewing the stripes together. I’m also assuming basic pattern making concepts are understood (just in the interest of time here, folks), so if you have questions about the terms I use or any part of this process, please let me know. I’m happy to help! In the coming weeks, I will dedicate a post to basic pattern making concepts.
  • My skirt is 27″ from the waist with six stripes that measure 4.5″. I am 5’7″ so 27″ from the waist is a flattering midi length on me, but you may want to adjust the length to suit your height. The pleats are 6″ deep, and you may adjust these as well to be bigger or smaller or omit them altogether. If you don’t want the fullness of the pleats, you can always just separate the half circle skirt pattern into stripes and go from there.
  • When determining the length of the skirt and the width of the stripes, just keep proportion in mind. We don’t want stripes that are too narrow or too wide.
  • I lined my skirts using the half circle skirt pattern, not the pleated skirt pattern.

So, here’s the front half circle skirt pattern. Remember that this is cut on the fold which is why we’re only looking at half of it.

Because the half circle is already pretty flared, we can jump right into adding the pleats. This skirt has three inverted box pleats in the front and two in the back, along with a knife or “side” pleat on either side of the zipper in center back. 6″ has been added to create the pleats, so you only need to add 3″ at center front (because it’s cut on the fold), and 6″ for the second pleat. The placement for the second pleat is roughly halfway between center front and the side seam.

You can see the gray paper I added to center front for the first pleat and the line I’ve drawn to mark the placement for the second pleat.

Cut the pattern along the line, completely separating it. Then, add 6″ for the pleat.

On the gray paper we just added, mark down the middle at 3″. This is where the pleat will meet after we’ve folded it. Remember that center front is cut on the fold, so we’ve only added 3″ there instead of 6″. So when you fold your paper it will only be half of the pleat. For reference, here’s a visual from my pattern making book that illustrates inverted box pleats very well:

Here you can see that I’ve folded the pleats in place and trued the waistline. Cut off the excess paper. Determine the length of your skirt and cut off excess paper at the hem.

After the pleats are added and folded and the waistline trued, your pattern will look something like this.

Now, we need to determine the width of the stripes. Once you know how wide you want the stripes, measure from the waistline down that amount. There’s your top stripe! Then, measure down the same amount from the line we just drew to create the second stripe and so on.

I’m pointing to the first stripe here:

Once you’ve drawn all of your stripes, cut each one and add seam allowance. This part takes paper, lots of tape, and an upbeat playlist to help get you through it! When each stripe has been separated and seam allowance added, the skirt will look like this, and remember to label each piece along with whether it’s a color stripe or white or print or what have you.

 Repeat this process for the back skirt, putting the pleat roughly halfway between center back and the side seam. The original version of this skirt had a full box pleat at center back, but over time I decided it was a bit bulky, so now it’s just a knife pleat. You may add this or just have the one inverted box pleat in the back.

Cut the skirt on the crossgrain, and make sure to double notch at center back. This skirt is easy to make, but there are parts that are quite tedious, and cutting it out is definitely one of them. Remember that playlist I mentioned earlier? Yeah, you’ll want it again.

Navy stripes being cut:

White stripes being cut:

I like to line up my pieces in order and sew them together starting with the bottom piece. That way, when I get to the last stripe, it’s the shortest. I’m always happy to get to that last piece!

And here’s a trick to make sewing the front stripes together easier: start at center front instead of one side and sewing the length of the seam at once. I’ve found that starting at center front is much easier, and there’s never an issue lining the seams up. So, when you cut your front skirt stripes, notch at center front of each stripe piece so you can match it to the next stripe and so forth.

Here you can see the notches at center front I made when I cut out the front stripes. Starting from the top or bottom–wherever you want–match the stripe pieces at center front and sew together from center front to the side seam. Then, turn the pieces over and, starting at center front again, sew to the opposite side seam. This step isn’t necessary, it just makes things easier.

The next tip is important: serge the seams and press them as you go, not once the entire front or back piece is assembled. I press the seam allowances towards the color stripe, which goes against pressing rules, but I don’t like seeing the seam allowance through the white stripe.

Insert the pockets. 

Be careful to match the stripe when you sew the side seams, but the rest of the skirt construction is easy and just like any other skirt. Attach the waistband, insert the zipper, drop in the lining, hem. Then, you’re done!

Once you’ve got the concept down, have a ball applying it to whatever you want. Tops, jackets, accessories, you name it. I’ve always wanted a striped pencil skirt, and I had an idea for an orange one because I knew it would pair beautifully with a blouse I made a couple months ago. And it does!

I used Butterick 5466 to make this skirt. You can see the other version I made in this post.

I added about 4″ to the length of this skirt, as well as a back vent and I widened the waistband and lined the skirt in Bemberg rayon. Tutorial for adding the back vent and how to sew it coming next week!

You know I like my makes to be as versatile as possible. You may not think that an orange stripe pencil skirt can be translated into a lot of different looks–the ceiling of versatility isn’t quite as high with this one as it is the others–but there’s still a number of things you can do with it. Go cute and casual:

Or, dress it up. More about this top here.

Lately, I’ve been putting bias tape or ribbon along the waistline seam of my skirts. It serves no practical purpose, but it sure does look pretty. I love navy and gold together, so I used gold bias tape in this skirt:

And I used an orange floral print quilting cotton to make bias tape for the orange skirt:

If you’re at all intimidated by this skirt, don’t be. It’s not complicated or difficult, just a little time consuming and tedious. But the result is so worth it!

As always, let me know if you need clarification on anything in this post. Have a wonderful weekend, and send me pictures of your striped projects!

Happy Sewing!

how to: slanted pockets

I love pockets. I like having them in most of my garments for a lot of reasons, but I especially like them because they’re practical. For me, it’s worth the effort to include a pocket or two in most of my garments because I actually use them. Sometimes I slip my phone or my keys in my pockets if my hands are full, and there’s usually a lip gloss or chapstick hanging out in there too. Plus, isn’t there a “cool girl” vibe with pockets in womenswear? Guys get to stand around with their hands in their pockets looking all laid back and chill, why can’t we do the same thing?

There’s so many different types of pockets, so incorporating them into a project is not only easy, but it’s a fun challenge to think about what particular pocket would work best. Most of the pockets I make are hidden side seam pockets, but I really like patch pockets on shirtdresses and skirts and welt pockets on pants and tailored coats. I happen to really, really like slanted front pockets too, the subject of today’s post. Also called angled pockets or inserted seam pockets, this pocket is created by drawing a line from the waist to the side seam, which becomes the entry for the pocket. You see this type of pocket a lot on pants.

This is the slanted pocket on my linen pants, which you’ll see in more detail as soon as I finish a blouse to wear with them. Pattern is Vogue 8836, out-of-print.

I like this pocket design on unlined skirts because it’s a much cleaner look on the inside. With summer fast approaching (it was 90 degrees the other day, so maybe it’s already summer here?), I’m thinking about all the things on my list to make to stay comfortable this summer. Loose fitting and lightweight tops, linen everything, and unlined skirts are a few things I’m focused on right now. When I finally found the lemon print fabric of my dreams a few weeks ago, I bought enough for a couple of garments knowing one of them was going to be an unlined skirt. I will get so much use out of this skirt.

I wanted something relatively simple in design, but with a little flare and personality, so I went with Butterick 6129 again, after a successful first try with it back in January. Only this time, the pockets would be different. I made a quick change to the pattern for slanted front pockets, and just like that, I have a new summer skirt. (Definitely making this one in a couple more colors!)

The first version of this skirt, which will make my top ten list of projects for 2017, for sure.

So, to draft slanted front pockets, it’s as easy as drawing a line from the waistline to the side seam. You don’t want to come too far in on the waistline, and be careful to draw a line down to a point on the side seam that is neither too small nor too long. You want an opening that can accommodate your hand.

This is the front skirt pattern piece, before any changes. I came in from the waistline 1.5″, and drew a line approximately 8″ long, down to the side seam. (This is covered by the tape now, because I got ahead of myself and cut it off before taking a picture. Silly me.)

Then, draw the outline for your pocket. You couldn’t see my outline in the photo, so the blue line indicates where it is. My outline includes seam allowance of 1/4″.

Trace the outline you just drew, along with the waistline and side seams. This becomes the pocket itself, or entry/pocket pouch.

Then, the corner piece that was created when the entry point line was drafted gets cut off. Before doing this, add seam allowance. I always add 1/4″, because anything more will just get trimmed off.

Trace again for the pocket lining/backing piece.

This next step is important, especially if your skirt has design elements like pleats or gathers. In my case, there are four front pleats, so I folded them and taped them in place. Then, place your pocket pieces on top, matching at the side seams and adjust the waistline if necessary. This is called truing your pattern, and I needed to add about 1/8″ to my pocket pieces. It may not seam like much, but we always want matching pattern pieces so that nothing pulls or hangs in a weird way.

I always do this with the waistline facing me, which is why it may seem like this is upside down.

The arrow points to the small adjustment I made to the pocket so that it matched the waistline seam with the pleats folded.

With the pocket pieces taped in place, draw the grainline by marking a line parallel to center front.

Once the pieces are cut out, sew the lining pocket pieces to the skirt front.

Then, press the pocket lining away from the skirt. Then, fold it under the skirt, press, and topstitch.

Topstitched:

Now the pocket gets sewn to the pocket lining. Sew all the way around, then serge. You can also pink or use bias binding if you don’t have a serger. Or, if you’re feeling extra couture-y, cut these with a bigger seam allowance and sew the pockets together with a French seam. Press.

Sewn and serged:

Next, baste the pocket to the side seam

Then, serge the side seams of your skirt.

Sew the side seams and press open.

Finish the skirt as you normally would. The finished pocket will look like this:

Because this skirt isn’t lined, I used a little bias tape along the edge of the waistband lining. It’s certainly not necessary and it doesn’t serve any purpose, but it’s a nice detail that finishes that edge nicely. I sewed it to the waistband lining along the seam allowance and then hand sewed it along the waistline seam.

I’ve made quite a few skirts with slanted front pockets, and I’m excited to make a couple more for summer. I think a denim version is a must, as is a great basic like khaki or white. These three skirts are my own design, the ‘Louisa’ skirt.

making modifications: vogue 8745

I usually buy patterns for one of two reasons, and the longer I journey down this road of building a handmade wardrobe, the clearer that becomes. It seems that all of my projects so far this year fall into one of these categories. Sometimes, a commercial pattern just speaks to me in that I’m-so-perfect-for-you-take-me-home-and-sew-me-at-once kind of way, or I already have an idea in mind and I search and search and search until I find a pattern I can work with and modify it to match my vision. The tops in today’s post fall into the latter category. After dipping my toes in the trendy waters of off-the-shoulder tops and ruffles, I can safely say that I love both, so my desire to add more of them to my closet coupled with my genuine need for cute, versatile tops made this a challenge worth taking on. Only this time, I needed something that wasn’t off-the-shoulder.

I knew I wanted a top with a ruffle along the neckline, but I didn’t want a messy ruffle. All these tops we’re seeing with elastic around the neckline are super cute (and, hello, I made three of them last month), but not all fabrics are suited for that particular design element. That’s a lot of fabric in one area, and I wanted something cleaner. Oddly enough, I couldn’t find a pattern that wasn’t off-the-shoulder or that didn’t have elastic around the neckline. I also can’t find a pattern for a one shoulder top that doesn’t go underneath the opposite arm, but that’s a topic for next month . . .

Eventually, during a McCall’s out-of-print sale a few weeks back, I found a pattern I could work with. I liked the ruffle and the semi-fitted bodice, and I knew I could leave off the sleeves and shorten it a little and it would be the exact top I had in mind. The pattern suggests very lightweight fabrics like chiffon and crepe de chine, but I knew that linen and lightweight cotton shirting would also work. The pattern also instructs you to fully line the top, but I ignored that and opted for bias tape at the neck and armhole edges instead.

I got to work right away making the front ruffle one piece instead of two. It was as easy as matching the front ruffle piece to the front bodice piece and drawing a new center front line.

Here, I’ve placed the ruffle piece on top of the front bodice piece, matching the circle on the neckline at center front. The lower blue arrow in the photo points to the center front line on the bodice piece, which is what I want the ruffle to match.

I re-drew the center front line on the ruffle piece by tracing the center front from the bodice pattern piece. The pink hash marks on the ruffle pattern indicate that that line is no longer part of the pattern and can be cut off.

And now the center front matches on both the ruffle and the bodice. The same result could have been achieved by slashing and spreading the ruffle piece just enough to push the center front to its new position, but it didn’t need to be adjusted that much to justify that much trouble.

Originally, I planned to have a double ruffle on this top, but opted for a single layer in the end because the additional layer was redundant and a little distracting. I did cut it out for the muslin, however, and noticed that the smaller pattern piece overlapped the fold of my fabric. If this happens to you, it’s an easy fix. Simple remove some of the fullness from the pattern piece so that it doesn’t overlap your fabric.

Here, you can see the pattern piece overlapping the fold of my fabric when center front is pinned down.

Now, cut the pattern to but not through the neckline edge of the pattern piece. I always like to do this in more than one spot so that my adjustments are evenly spaced out.

To remove some of the fullness from the pattern, overlap the paper and tape it down, keeping an eye on the side seam of the pattern piece. Once it’s been adjusted, it will look like this, and it shouldn’t overlap the fold of the fabric. You may need to true the neckline and hem edges of the pattern pieces. Because this pattern piece is so full, it won’t be terrible affected by the fullness we removed.

I added seam allowance at center back so I could cut two of the back bodice pieces instead of cutting it on the fold (which is a huge waste of fabric). I shortened the top by 2″, but made no other changes. This top is a dream to sew. It’s one of those easy projects we all like to work on every once in a while!

I had just enough green gingham left over from this dress project for this top, and I also wanted to make it in white and blue. I found the white cotton shirting at Hobby Lobby (they have a couple great fabrics this season!), and the blue pinstripe shirting came from JoAnn. They’re getting a lot of new, pretty shirtings in for spring, which I think is fantastic.

This top checks all the boxes for me because it goes with so many things. It’s comfy and cute with jeans and wedges or it can just as easily be tucked into a skirt or high-waisted pants (you know I love tucking things in). I also love how it looks with this maxi skirt I’ve had for ages. I wear maxi skirts, a lightweight blouse, and a hat all the time in the summer. Now I’m looking forward to making a few new maxi skirts!

I found this skirt at Ann Taylor a couple years ago, and I’ve worn it so many times I’ve lost count. I’ve paired just about everything with it: button up shirts, tees, sweaters, silk blouses, and cardigans. Loving how this sweet blue top looks with it!

I started making this skirt a year and a half ago, and it sat in my alterations closet for ages because it eventually became too big for me. Just last week, I finally took it in, so it’s ready to go (yay!). I used a muted pale pink heavy cotton twill to make it. It’s a full circle, and I like my circle skirts one of two ways: light as air and wonderfully floaty, or substantial enough to “stand up” on their own and look like a big circle skirt is supposed to look. For more information on making a circle skirt pattern for yourself, see this post from last fall.

One thing I really love about this top is that even though there’s no sleeves on it, the ruffle acts as the sleeve. It’s a creative way to not only stay cool in summer, but to cover your arms if you want.

And for a more work appropriate look, keep traditional color combinations in mind. I say it all the time, but that rule still applies to a lot of conservative workplaces. I absolutely love that I can put this top with a pretty pink skirt for a lovely, ladylike outfit and turn around and put it with some tailored black trousers and be ready for a meeting some other grown up function where bopping in wearing lace or a big pink skirt might not be the best idea.

I have some ideas for a few more tops and blouses, both with and without ruffles, so I’m looking forward to tackling those projects in the coming weeks. For now, I’ll be taking a little break from all the tops and pouring some energy into a few new dresses and skirts. You could say that this latest round of blouses has me “topped off” in that department. Ha!

Have a great weekend!

PS: I made my own single fold bias tape for the gingham and blue tops, and I used pre-made white bias tape on the white blouse. Ran out of fabric to make my own!