stars in my eyes: Vogue 9251 (version 2)

My dad has a saying about buying things: always get two. Found the perfect pair of jeans? Get two. Need a pack of batteries? Get two. Now, of course I don’t make it a habit of buying or making two of everything, but it’s a good concept to keep in mind. The idea of making two (or multiples, as is the case with me quite often) makes sense to me in sewing. We invest so much time and energy into making our clothes, why not get as much value out of it as you possibly can?

When I’m making a garment I’m focused on three things: how it fits, how I feel in it, and how well it works for my lifestyle. In the year and a half that I’ve been rebuilding my wardrobe, I’ve discovered a handful of patterns that for a variety of reasons work especially well for me. I’ll put a few examples at the end of this post, but Vogue 9251 is another one of those patterns. Funny enough, I never would have thought it would make the list of multiple makes, because the low neckline isn’t something I’m too comfortable in. Turns out, the fit and easy construction makes up for that. And don’t get me started on those darling sleeves. The other thing I like about this pattern is that you can draft a number of different skirts onto the bodice, which can change things up quite dramatically.

The first time I made this dress I was in make-everything-you-possibly-can mode prior to my Memorial Day trip to Nashville, so I didn’t make a muslin for the dress (something I never skip). The bodice turned out to be a little short on me, but I loved the dress and I knew I would make it again. So, I lengthened the bodice by about 1.5″, which was as easy as cutting the pattern along the “lengthen or shorten line,” taping paper underneath to add the length, and truing the sides. I also made a swayback adjustment to the back bodice (which is why the dart looks a little wonky).

For this version, I chose a stunning rayon twill print, and not only does it feel like butter it’s also completely opaque, meaning it can stand alone as a dress without a lining.

The thing that makes this version so interesting is the difference in the drape of the fabric. The fabric I used for this dress is a suggested fabric for the pattern, but the linen I used before is not. The linen version is in no way bad or wrong, it’s just different. This side by side of the sleeves demonstrates the characteristics of each fabric really well.

The linen on the left is a medium weight so it’s naturally more stiff and voluminous. It has lovely drape, but notice how it drapes away from my arm more than the rayon sleeve.

I drafted a full skirt for this rayon version, simply because I had enough fabric, and I absolutely love a full, floaty rayon skirt that swooshes as much as possible when I walk. I also knew that the fabric would fall along the bias, so instead of worrying about maintaining the shape of the skirt from the pattern while keeping it level, I went with something full that would need to be leveled the same amount all the way around. I left the dress on the form for a couple of days to let the fabric fall as much as possible, and then I evened it out. You can see here just how much the fabric relaxed. (For more on leveling a hem, see this post from last fall.)

When I can, I like to make my own bias tape, and I was able to do that for this dress. I love how it looks.

I used snaps to close the linen dress, but I followed the pattern instructions this time and made bias strips for the side ties. This limits me to only being able to wear the dress like this (can’t really put a belt on top of the ties, that’d be weird), but I like them. They stay tied too, which was my biggest concern.

I can’t tell you how comfortable this dress is. It’s probably as close to wearing jimmy jams as you can get.

I’ll be making this dress at least one more time, and I’m very excited about this version. I’ll be using a very lightweight blue floral rayon crepe and making the maxi version (view B). I’m going with the skirt from the pattern (no changes this time), but I am toying with the idea of adding a ruffle to the neckline. The fabric is so delicate and drapes so nicely that I think a ruffle might be lovely added detail.

I’m delighted that this pattern worked so well, and with (soon to be) three versions of it, I can file it under the “multiple makes” category, along with a few other cherished patterns.

Vogue 8825

Vogue 9197

The striped skirt.

Vogue 8772

Happy Sewing!

5 COMMENTS

  1. Emily | 2nd Aug 17

    Thank you for replying! I think your work is just beautiful, and I love that you keep at it. Can’t wait to see the third version.

  2. Ginger Barlow | 1st Aug 17

    You should make that wrap dress over and over again until you have one to wear every day!!! You look stunning in it!

  3. PsychicSewerKathleen | 1st Aug 17

    I love it when you find a pattern that just works so well for you – you want to make it again and again! This dress is perfect on you! Beautiful in that drapey starry fabric. I don’t have any wrap dresses or tops but I have a few patterns that are wrap and everyone keeps saying how flattering and comfortable they are so I’ll keep yours in mind too when I go down this wrap road! Thank you for a really inspiring post!

  4. Emily O'Brien | 1st Aug 17

    Both dresses are lovely, but I think the waistline on the first dress was perfect, and the adjusted one on this dress looks too low. Still, both are lovely, and you are a sewing inspiration!

    • Emily | 1st Aug 17

      Hi Emily, thank you for your comment! I agree that the rayon version is a tad too long in the waist, but the bodice of the linen dress is definitely too short. Because it wasn’t long enough for me, it created a pleat under the bust where the fabric bunched up – because it had nowhere to go. If the waistline was hitting me at my natural waist, that wouldn’t happen. I have adjusted the length of the bodice by about 3/4″, which should be perfect for the third version. 🙂

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