how to: add a vent in a straight skirt

I’ve never been one for mini skirts. I don’t really have the legs for a skirt that short, and I’ve always wondered about the whole sitting-down-and-actually-doing-things-in-a short-skirt dilemma. But I do have the height to pull off a skirt that falls below my knees. Good thing too, since my preferred skirt length falls somewhere between right below the knee and mid calf. I add length to my skirts on just about every project.

Any skirt with adequate sweep in the hem is a no-brainer to lengthen, but the closer fitting pencil and straight skirts require an extra step or two to make them wearable. Enter, the back vent. Today, I’m going to show you how add a classic back vent to straight skirt patterns, and then we’ll go over how to sew it. Just like everything else, there’s more than one way to go about this, and it’s up to each seamstress to determine what’s best for her project. A pleat in the center front seam can be a fun alternative to a basic back vent. Or, a flared gore in the center back seam elevates the back vent to an intentional design detail. I’ve seen pleats in the back princess seams too, which is also another interesting option.

Adding a back vent to a skirt is as easy as adding length and width to the center back seam. The length of the vent itself depends on how long the skirt is. For some context, my skirt is 27″ from my waist, and I made my vent about 8″ long. You don’t want a vent that comes up too close to your backside, but you also want a vent long enough to allow for your normal stride.

So, to the center back seam of my pattern I added a piece measuring 2″ wide by about 8″ tall.

I like to curve the top of the vent, to make serging the center back seam easier.

And that’s it for the pattern! The back skirt pieces are both cut the same.

To create the back vent, the back seam is sewn together from the bottom of the zipper to the edge of the vent. Here, my center back seams have been sewn together, and I’ve turned the skirt right sides out and placed it on my ironing board. I have turned under the serged edges of the vent, and I will sew those before sewing the vent together.

Once the edges of the vent are sewn:

Now the vent gets pressed in place. It doesn’t matter to what side the vent gets pressed, just use a hem gauge to make sure what you’re pressing is accurate. Remember that that vent is 2″ wide, and I just pressed under 1/4″, so now it’s 1 3/4″.

After the vent has been pressed, carefully pin it in place. Now, here’s the trick I learned in college: use a piece of tape as a sewing guide. Place it at the top of the vent, making sure that your sewing line will go through all the layers of both sides of the vent at the top. It’s also a good idea to go just beyond the center back seam and either backstitch or bartack this spot to make it as strong as possible.

Tape in place:

Sew alongside one side of the tape guide.

One thing you sometimes see on a back vent is a sewing line from the top of the vent to the hem, which keeps the top side of the vent in place. I opted not to do that on the orange striped skirt to keep distracting topstitching to a minimum. I also knew I would go back in and tack the vent down on the inside, which is a totally acceptable option. If you sew the vent along one side, it will look like this (I know the bright green thread is hard to see clearly):

Once the vent is sewn in place, hem the skirt. This particular skirt has a 2″ hem, which I hemmed using the blind hem stitch on my sewing machine.

Hem completed:

And that’s it!

There are other ways to add the vent to the lining, but this method is my favorite. It’s simple and straightforward. So, if your skirt is lined, follow the same steps to add a back vent to the lining.

Back vents are one of those things that may seem intimidating at first, but after doing it once it clicks. Then, you’ll feel like you can do them with your eyes closed!

Happy sewing!

5 COMMENTS

  1. Suzie | 25th May 17

    I love this skirt, you look so great in it! Thank you for the vent tutorial, I learnt a few gem there – like curving the top of the vent so that its easier to serge (so obvious, but I never thought of it!) and using the tape to know where to sew the top of the vent – such a great tip! Thanks again, your posts are always so informative, as are your Instastories. Have you thought about starting up a YouTube channel? You explain things so clearly and your sewing is of such a high standard that I think it would be very popular – I would certainly be tuning in to every video!!

    • Emily | 28th May 17

      Hi, Suzie! I’m so glad the post was helpful! I cut many a back vent without that curve and quickly learned that the curve is very useful. Ha! And we can thank my favorite professor for the tape tip. I use it every time! I have a YouTube channel, but there’s nothing on it yet. Thank you for watching my Stories! I am seriously considering jumping into video content this summer. I think I just might have to do it! 🙂

  2. Brittany | 24th May 17

    Perfection! And I love the different ways you styled it!!

  3. Diane Fronefield | 24th May 17

    I just have to say…I am too happy when I have an email saying there is something new on your blog!!!
    I love searching it anyhow, but love the new stuff. Thank you so much!!And being 5’91/2″, I understand the adding length to thing-it’s one reason I started sewing as a teenager.

    • Emily | 28th May 17

      Thank you, Diane! 🙂

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