how to: slanted pockets

I love pockets. I like having them in most of my garments for a lot of reasons, but I especially like them because they’re practical. For me, it’s worth the effort to include a pocket or two in most of my garments because I actually use them. Sometimes I slip my phone or my keys in my pockets if my hands are full, and there’s usually a lip gloss or chapstick hanging out in there too. Plus, isn’t there a “cool girl” vibe with pockets in womenswear? Guys get to stand around with their hands in their pockets looking all laid back and chill, why can’t we do the same thing?

There’s so many different types of pockets, so incorporating them into a project is not only easy, but it’s a fun challenge to think about what particular pocket would work best. Most of the pockets I make are hidden side seam pockets, but I really like patch pockets on shirtdresses and skirts and welt pockets on pants and tailored coats. I happen to really, really like slanted front pockets too, the subject of today’s post. Also called angled pockets or inserted seam pockets, this pocket is created by drawing a line from the waist to the side seam, which becomes the entry for the pocket. You see this type of pocket a lot on pants.

This is the slanted pocket on my linen pants, which you’ll see in more detail as soon as I finish a blouse to wear with them. Pattern is Vogue 8836, out-of-print.

I like this pocket design on unlined skirts because it’s a much cleaner look on the inside. With summer fast approaching (it was 90 degrees the other day, so maybe it’s already summer here?), I’m thinking about all the things on my list to make to stay comfortable this summer. Loose fitting and lightweight tops, linen everything, and unlined skirts are a few things I’m focused on right now. When I finally found the lemon print fabric of my dreams a few weeks ago, I bought enough for a couple of garments knowing one of them was going to be an unlined skirt. I will get so much use out of this skirt.

I wanted something relatively simple in design, but with a little flare and personality, so I went with Butterick 6129 again, after a successful first try with it back in January. Only this time, the pockets would be different. I made a quick change to the pattern for slanted front pockets, and just like that, I have a new summer skirt. (Definitely making this one in a couple more colors!)

The first version of this skirt, which will make my top ten list of projects for 2017, for sure.

So, to draft slanted front pockets, it’s as easy as drawing a line from the waistline to the side seam. You don’t want to come too far in on the waistline, and be careful to draw a line down to a point on the side seam that is neither too small nor too long. You want an opening that can accommodate your hand.

This is the front skirt pattern piece, before any changes. I came in from the waistline 1.5″, and drew a line approximately 8″ long, down to the side seam. (This is covered by the tape now, because I got ahead of myself and cut it off before taking a picture. Silly me.)

Then, draw the outline for your pocket. You couldn’t see my outline in the photo, so the blue line indicates where it is. My outline includes seam allowance of 1/4″.

Trace the outline you just drew, along with the waistline and side seams. This becomes the pocket itself, or entry/pocket pouch.

Then, the corner piece that was created when the entry point line was drafted gets cut off. Before doing this, add seam allowance. I always add 1/4″, because anything more will just get trimmed off.

Trace again for the pocket lining/backing piece.

This next step is important, especially if your skirt has design elements like pleats or gathers. In my case, there are four front pleats, so I folded them and taped them in place. Then, place your pocket pieces on top, matching at the side seams and adjust the waistline if necessary. This is called truing your pattern, and I needed to add about 1/8″ to my pocket pieces. It may not seam like much, but we always want matching pattern pieces so that nothing pulls or hangs in a weird way.

I always do this with the waistline facing me, which is why it may seem like this is upside down.

The arrow points to the small adjustment I made to the pocket so that it matched the waistline seam with the pleats folded.

With the pocket pieces taped in place, draw the grainline by marking a line parallel to center front.

Once the pieces are cut out, sew the lining pocket pieces to the skirt front.

Then, press the pocket lining away from the skirt. Then, fold it under the skirt, press, and topstitch.

Topstitched:

Now the pocket gets sewn to the pocket lining. Sew all the way around, then serge. You can also pink or use bias binding if you don’t have a serger. Or, if you’re feeling extra couture-y, cut these with a bigger seam allowance and sew the pockets together with a French seam. Press.

Sewn and serged:

Next, baste the pocket to the side seam

Then, serge the side seams of your skirt.

Sew the side seams and press open.

Finish the skirt as you normally would. The finished pocket will look like this:

Because this skirt isn’t lined, I used a little bias tape along the edge of the waistband lining. It’s certainly not necessary and it doesn’t serve any purpose, but it’s a nice detail that finishes that edge nicely. I sewed it to the waistband lining along the seam allowance and then hand sewed it along the waistline seam.

I’ve made quite a few skirts with slanted front pockets, and I’m excited to make a couple more for summer. I think a denim version is a must, as is a great basic like khaki or white. These three skirts are my own design, the ‘Louisa’ skirt.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Destty | 8th May 17

    lovely you are an inspiration

  2. Judit Dee | 4th May 17

    So… What’s your size again??? Lol! I need to make myself comfortable a grab a few of your skirts and dresses lol! And how did it take me that long to grab my computer and visit your blog? Obviously following your on IG is not enough! I’ll be watching yours posts very closely from now on! You already know I love your style and drool at your colourful and full of prints wardrobe (TOTALLY my style)! I need to get quilting cotton of similar weight to line my summer clothes!
    Let me scroll down more posts now!

  3. Sue Keator | 3rd May 17

    I love these skirts! And pockets – yes! Why is it that so few womens’ clothes have pockets? Guess we just have to make our own.

  4. Tanya | 3rd May 17

    Thank you for the tutorial. Very helpful. I have been inspired to up my game in my sewing. If you were to line your summer skirts what type of cotton lining would you suggest. Thank you again looking forward to your tutorial on the stripe skirt.

    • Emily | 3rd May 17

      Hi Tanya! Thank you for your comment! Great question about lining. Cotton lawn or voile is a wonderful option for a lightweight summer lining. I use a very soft quilting cotton to line a lot of my garments, but lawn, voile, and batiste might be a better option during the summer. Hope that helps. Stripe skirt tutorial coming soon! 🙂

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