sweet sleeves: mccall’s 7542

Spring seems to be the season for blouses. I’ve made more new tops this season than I think I ever have before, and that’s a good thing. If there is one thing my closet needs, it’s versatile tops that I can wear with jeans and different skirt styles and linen pants this summer. I’m well on my way to having lots of options, so I’m happy about that. Plus, I’m using a lot of fabric from my stash or end pieces of new cuts to make these little tops, which is icing on the cake. Feels good to bust through that stash!

This top came about as a solution to a styling issue I was having. I made a pair of white linen pants a couple months ago (and you saw a preview of them in this post from last week), but they pose an interesting styling challenge, thus the reason you haven’t seen them in a post of their own just yet. The pants sit at the natural waist and have a nice wide leg, so the best top is something that hits at the natural waist or something more fitted, like a tee or cute woven top. Enter, McCall’s 7542. (Side note: I have an idea or two for blouses to make for these pants. Coming soon!)

This pattern is from the spring collection, and I liked it right away for a number of reasons: the neckline is high enough to cover that pesky scar I’m always talking about, it’s not too fitted through the bodice but not too baggy either, and there are a lot of sleeve options. It’s also shorter than most other tops (but you can always add length to it if you want), so I thought the proportions would be ideal with the linen pants.

I made the blue version first (100% cotton shirting from my stash), in a size smaller than I normally go with, and I really like it. It’s incredibly easy to sew, the fit through the bust is nice and flattering, and I like the facing and hook and eye finish around the neckline. I know there are a lot of people totally averse to facings, but I like them every now and then. (My skirt is a denim pencil skirt from Madewell a couple years ago.)

I happened to have just enough of my cocktail dress fabric left over to cut another one of these tops, and I really like this one. It’s the fabric, really. It’s almost impossible to not like anything made out of it. I cut this one in my normal size. (The smaller size is nice on, but boy is it ever a task to put on and take off.) I like this one, but it is a little boxier through the bodice. Both tops are a challenge to put on and take off, but that happens sometimes with tops like this.

I tried both tops with the linen pants, but something about that combination didn’t sit right with me. Because the top is on the boxy side and it sits just below the natural waist, it almost cut me in half and there was no definition in the torso. I don’t love this combination as much as I like some of the other ways to wear this top. What do you think?

I may be on the fence about the linen pants pairing, but there are a lot of ways to wear a top like this, because it’s quite versatile. I wore it a couple weekends ago to run a few errands, and it was really comfortable and cute. A boxier cut like this goes well with a more fitted bottom, which is why this is one of my favorite looks. Comfy skinny jeans, a hat, some cute sneakers and you’re good to go.

This brocade is fancier than the blue cotton version, which is a nice option for this top. Different fabrics automatically give it a different feel. I like that this version can be paired with comfy white boyfriend jeans and flats and still feel put together, and it can also go with a pretty coral skirt and heels for a more intentional dressed up look.

Boyfriend jeans are Levi’s.

Skirt is J. Crew from last year.

Incorporating trends into our off-duty clothes is one thing, but it’s quite another to do that at the office. Sleeves and ruffles and flounces are making waves this year, and the way to enjoy those details at work is to do it in a traditional color or fabric, especially in a more conservative workplace. If you’re lucky enough to work in a creative environment, go all out!

Here, I’ve paired the blue version of this top with a classic black skirt and pumps. It’s not too flashy or over the top, which is perfect for the office. Plus, you still feel on trend and cute, which is the best part of wearing clothes.

With all the time we invest into making our clothes, I’m always the most pleased with the garments that feel the most “me” or that are the most versatile, and these two tops definitely fall into the latter category. If I make this blouse again, I will go with the pleated sleeve, lengthen it to make it a tunic, and add a sash belt.

If you’ve made this top, I’d love to hear what you think. Have a great week, and I hope you’re able to squeeze in some sewing!

2 COMMENTS

  1. sew2all | 24th Apr 17

    Hi, Emily, I purchased this pattern as soon as it came out, I’m planning on making the pleated version first and pairing it with a maxi skirt, hopefully soon. You asked about the top with the linen pants. I think what’s going on is the eye is drawn across the waist—-sleeves, belt, pleats in the pants, sleeves. I notice in view 3 of the pattern, her sleeves end up above her elbow. Maybe that is what the top paired with the pants needs, a shorter sleeve. Love the linen pants. I’m also a fan of facings, I usually add them instead of bias tape. Just gives some oomph to the neckline and armholes. Look forward to all your posts.

    • Emily | 24th Apr 17

      Hi! Thank you so much for this wonderful comment! I agree with you–the eye sort of goes straight across the waistline and there’s a lot going on. You’re exactly right, a sleeve slightly shorter or longer would be much better. I love those linen pants too! I’m thinking of making a button up blouse with a sash tie or maybe something more fitted and cropped would do the trick with those pants. Either way, they’re too good to pair them with something blah! 🙂 Have a great week!

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